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Jeep JK Winch Bumper by ShrockWorks

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Really popular modification that most Jeep owners will do to their Wranglers is to replace the factory front plastic bumper that came with their stock Jeep JK, with a heavy duty offroad bumper. Aftermarket bumpers offer a ton of advantages over the factory bumper, providing better protection for the front of the Jeep, but most of all allowing you to install a winch and additional offroad lighting. Depending on the design, aftermarket offroad front bumper might also increase your Jeep’s approach angle and expose the front wheels, making it easier to put tires on large obstacles. It might also include steel skid plate, protecting the electronic sway bar disconnect motor, if your Jeep has one.
Aftermarket bumpers generally come in three sizes: full width, mid width, and stubby. When choosing your new offroad bumper you will need to decide on the width, which depends on the way you plan on using your Jeep. You need to also decide if you’re going to mount a winch to it, and whether you prefer a top mounting winch bumper or an in-bumper mounting option with winch plate located between frame rails.

There are plenty of manufacturers offering aftermarket offroad bumpers. You can find different designs made by companies like: Poison Spyder, Rugged Ridge, Rock Hard 4×4, Teraflex, ShrockWorks, Evo Manufacturing, Smittybilt, Artec Industries, M.O.R.E., Crawler Conceptz, LOD, Rampage Products, ARB, Bestop, DV8, Or-Fab, AEV, Rough Country, Warn, Barricade, JCR Offroad, and others. You can often order your new bumper from an online store like Northridge4x4, ExtremeTerrain or Quadratec and if they have it in stock, you’ll receive it in few days. Some manufacturers build your new bumper after you place an order with them, so you will have to be more patient since it might take few weeks before you receive your bumper.

Depending on the brand and design of your new offroad front bumper, there might be some modifications to your Jeep that are necessary before installation. If you go with a bumper that has a winch mounting plate between the frame rails, you need to make sure that it will fit, and that might mean that your vacuum pump needs to be relocated and it’s stock mounting bracket needs to be cut off. Refer to instructions that come with your aftermarket bumper to be clear on requirements.

Obviously before installing your new aftermarket bumper, the factory bumper needs to come off. This is often the part that takes the longest, and if you have factory fog lights, you need to pay close attention to the wires and disconnect everything before pulling off the stock bumper.
Here’s a good video showing you how to remove factory front bumper on your Jeep Wrangler JK.

There were several requirements I had for my new offroad bumper. I decided that I wanted a stubby bumper, with low winch mounting position between frame rails, allowing good air flow to the radiator, integrated recovery points, no fog lights but instead brackets for offroad flood lights, welded-on bull guard providing additional protection, and included skid plate.
After researching for a very long time and reading countless reviews, I decided on a Shrockworks stubby front winch bumper. It checked all the boxes for me, and other owners seem very happy with the quality of their products (especially the quality of their welds).
I contacted the sales person at Shrockworks and discussed all the options. They were very knowledgeable and helpful, and after mentioning that I already own the Superwinch Tiger Shark 9500 winch, I was advised to get the “offset” version of the bumper, with the fairlead slot cut off center, towards driver side. It is due to the position of the drum on the Tiger Shark winch.

This post will describe steps to install a Jeep JK bumper by ShrockWorks, including removal of the vacuum pump bracket to fit the winch plate, as well as installation of the Superwinch Tiger Shark 9500 winch.
Whatever combination of bumper/winch you select for yourself, I would advise you to contact manufacturers of both, to confirm fitment. You can also contact the authorized dealers, including aftermarket offroad parts stores, since they should be knowledgeable in this topic.

Disclaimer: Like I always mention I am not a professional mechanic, I just try to do as much work on my Jeep as possible. It helps me learn more about my vehicle and save some money that can be spent on parts and upgrades.
I take no responsibility for any injury or breakage which might occur if you decide to follow these steps. You have to decide if you’re comfortable working on your Jeep. If you’re not, please have a professional complete this project for you.
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September 1, 2019 |

The Definitive Guide to Jeep Wrangler Wheels

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The Definitive Guide to Jeep Wrangler Wheels

PAOLI, Pa. (August 22nd, 2019) – The invention of the wheel spawned the creation of everything from potter’s wheels, to wheelbarrows, and even Jeep Wranglers! Wrangler wheels come in a variety of sizes and finishes so when it comes time to replace or upgrade your current set, a little bit of research goes a long way to ensure you have the right diameter wheel, coupled with the correct lug pattern, offset, and backspacing for your application.

ExtremeTerrain’s Jeep Wheel technical guide provides everything you need to know about Jeep Wrangler wheels in an easily digestible format armed with table of contents (for easy navigating), before and after imagery, specification tables, infographics, pros and cons, and video. There is even a section on choosing the best tire for your Wrangler for those looking to order a Jeep Wrangler wheel and tire kit.

View it here: https://www.extremeterrain.com/wrangler-jeep-aluminum-wheels-steel-wheels-explained.html
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August 23, 2019 |

Win $5K on ExtremeTerrain from RedRock 4×4

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JL Hill Descent Control Tested

PAOLI, Pa. (August 1st, 2019) – Attention all 2005+ Toyota Tacoma owners: here is your chance to win $5,000 in parts and accessories for your rig on ExtremeTerrain (XT), brought to you by RedRock 4×4. RedRock 4×4 is fast becoming one of the most trusted names in the Tacoma aftermarket by offering performance and styling parts that easily surpass factory OEM standards for outstanding quality.

The RedRock 4×4 Giveaway is an “enter – daily” sweepstakes which runs now until September 30th, 2019. For the best chance to win, participants can visit the RedRock 4×4 page on XT’s site and complete the entry daily — no purchase necessary. A winner will be selected on or around October 7, 2019 to be awarded with a $5,000 shopping spree on XT’s site. Everything is on the line; from Tacoma Bumpers to Lift Kits to Wheels & Tires. See official rules on entry form for exclusions and full details.

Enter to win here: https://www.extremeterrain.com/redrock-4×4-tacoma-parts.html

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About ExtremeTerrain

ExtremeTerrain.com is a leader in providing enthusiasts with aftermarket Jeep Wrangler and Toyota Tacoma parts. Located just outside Philadelphia, PA, ExtremeTerrain is dedicated to providing Wrangler and Tacoma owners with the best parts at the best prices while also ensuring the conservation and protection of off-road trails. Visit https://www.extremeterrain.com/

 

August 12, 2019 |

Jeep JK Cargo Area Light

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Jeep JK Cargo Area LightJeep Wrangler JK unfortunately lacks proper lighting in the rear cargo area. Any Wrangler owner probably experienced a situation when they were loading or unloading their Jeep after dark and could not see anything in the cargo area behind the back seats.
The interior dome light in a Jeep Wrangler JK is very weak and does not provide sufficient light for the cargo area, especially in a 2 door JK. With the rear lift gate open for extended period of time, dome light turns off after maximum of 10 minutes, unless you set the interior lights to “always on” on the multi-function switch/lever by the steering wheel. This timer is logical for courtesy lights, however it is impractical for overlanding or camping, when you might need to open the back of the Jeep multiple times while the engine is off, and leave the liftgate open for more than few minutes.

You can replace the dome light bulbs with LED to improve visibility a little bit, however it does not completely solve the problem at the back of the Jeep. The cargo area is notoriously dark. There is a clear need for additional light source under the liftgate.

There are several products available on the market, which try to solve this problem. One of them is the iKonic Cargo Light, which replaces the stock wiper motor cover and comes ready to install. It operates on a 9V battery which needs to be replaced periodically.
Another popular product is the Brawlee Jeep Wrangler LED Rear Glass Lift Gate Dome Light Bar, which attaches to the inside of the liftgate and can be plugged in to the rear power outlet or hardwired to the dome light.
You can purchase one of these products and it will most likely work great for you, depending on your needs.
You could also simply get a wireless, battery operated puck LED light and attach it to the inside of your Jeep’s hardtop.

Being more of a DIY person, I wanted to create my own custom solution, which would seamlessly integrate with my Jeep and look like it was there all along.
Inspired by the available products, I decided to combine some of the features together and install my own version of the cargo area light. One that would be integrated into the wiper motor cover and hidden as much as possible, provide just the right amount of light for either the rear of the Jeep OR the interior of the cargo area, and be hardwired to the constant power from the Jeep’s battery, thru the rear power outlet wiring, allowing me to switch it on & off at any time while the Jeep is parked and the engine is off.

I enjoy car camping with my Jeep and while spending the night in less developed campgrounds, I use my tailgate fold-down table a lot.

This post will describe a step by step fabrication and installation of a Jeep Wrangler JK cargo area light, however some of the details might apply only to my Jeep’s model year and trim level. If you own a different model year JK, you are welcome to follow all or most of the steps described below, or adjust anything you find necessary. Use this post as an inspiration for your own cargo area light solution.

Disclaimer: Like I always mention I am not a professional mechanic, I just try to do as much work on my Jeep as possible. It helps me learn more about my vehicle and save some money that can be spent on parts and upgrades.
I take no responsibility for any injury or breakage which might occur if you decide to follow these steps. You have to decide if you’re comfortable working on your Jeep. If you’re not, please have a professional complete this project for you.
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June 4, 2019 |

ExtremeTerrain’s Clean Trails Program

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JL Hill Descent Control Tested

PAOLI, Pa. (May 29, 2019) – ExtremeTerrain, the auto parts retailer known for customizing Jeep Wranglers and Toyota pick-ups, continues to give back through the Clean Trail Initiative program in 2019. Launched in 2015, the program seeks to reward local clubs and organizations with small, project-specific, grants to be used for trail maintenance and restoration. In the approximately 4 years since it started, the program has given out $21,650 in trail project grant funds.

The community of off-roading and 4×4 enthusiasts sometimes get a bad rap for their treatment of trails. There is a negative impression that many members of the off-roading community work hard to combat. There are dozens of non-profit organizations filled with conscientious 4×4 owners around the U.S. that organize excellent programs to clean and maintain the trails they use, while also educating the community of fellow 4-wheelers about the proper rules and regulations that govern lawful use of public and private lands.

ExtremeTerrain’s Clean Trail Initiative program was designed with these very organizations in mind. The clubs and groups that are out in the woods, are the front-line ambassadors for the good name of law-abiding, conscientious members of the Jeep and 4×4 community. Therefore, any little bit of support that the e-comm parts company can supply to these great folks is helping to bridge the divide between non-motorized outdoor recreational enthusiasts and the OHV community.

As 2019 ramps up into the spring and summer season, the need to support trail clean-ups and stewardship increases. Therefore, ExtremeTerrain is rededicating itself to the program. Application for 2019 trail grants are being accepted right now! It is very easy to submit a grant request.

Leaders of trail projects can visit the page https://www.extremeterrain.com/clean-trail-initiative-program.html, and sign-up through the easy online application. Members of the ExtremeTerrain team will notify grant winners within just a few days and get a package of trail cleaning supplies shipped out soon thereafter.

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About ExtremeTerrain

ExtremeTerrain.com is a leader in providing enthusiasts with aftermarket Jeep Wrangler and Toyota Tacoma parts. Located just outside Philadelphia, PA, ExtremeTerrain is dedicated to providing Wrangler and Tacoma owners with the best parts at the best prices while also ensuring the conservation and protection of off-road trails. Visit https://www.extremeterrain.com/

 

May 29, 2019 |

Horse Springs Campground

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Location: West of Alpine, Arizona.

Elevation: 7,610 feet

Season: May through October

Access: Dirt road

Fee: $14.00 per camp unit per night

Reservations: No reservations. Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Usage: Medium / High

Days Limit: 14 days

Amenities: 27 single unit sites, tent camping, trailer camping, trailers and motorhomes up to 32 foot, no hookups, picnic tables (at each campsite), rock fire rings, potable water faucets, vault toilets, pets must be restrained or on a leash, concessionaire operated

Information: Alpine Ranger District, Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests, (928) 339-5000 or www.fs.usda.gov/asnf

 

Weather in Alpine, AZ
68°
Sunny
WedThuFriSatSun
min 44°F
69/44°F
69/41°F
70/40°F
71/43°F

 

Directions: From Alpine, drive two miles north on US Highway 191 to Forest Road 249 (Three Forks Rd). Turn west and follow this paved forest road 5 miles to Forest Road 276 (graded dirt road). Turn south and follow Forest Road 276 for 10.5 miles.
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May 26, 2019 |

Jeep JK Differential Fluid Change

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Jeep JK Differential Fluid ChangeChanging the fluid in your Jeep JK front and rear differentials is an important part of routine maintenance. Fresh gear oil insures your differentials are well lubricated and function properly. And, unlike previous Jeep Wranglers, it is not necessary to remove the differential cover in order to do this. It is however recommended that you do so anyway from time to time (possibly every other fluid change) as it will give you a chance to inspect your gears and catch any damage or unusual wear.

Following “Schedule B” in the Jeep owner’s manual (heavy driving), you should change your differential fluids every 15,000 miles. However it is always a good idea to do this IF you’ve submerged your axles in deep water for prolonged periods of time. This post will provide instructions on how to perform a Jeep JK differential fluid change that applies to either Dana 30 or Dana 44 axles.

Front Dana 44 differential needs 2.7 pints (1.35 quarts) and the rear needs 4.75 pints (2.375 quarts). If you have factory covers, all you need to do is fill up your differentials until gear oil oozes out of the fill hole. If you have an after market differential cover that has a higher fill hole than factory, DO NOT be tempted to add any more gear oil than is needed. Doing so will result in a differential that is over-filled and will cause gear oil to get pumped out of the breather tube, creating a stinky mess. Gear oil level only needs to reach the bottom of your axle tubes.

NOTE: Rear differentials with Trac-Lok (limited slip clutch type differential, not used on the Rubicon), require the limited slip additive for the clutch plates. You can also use synthetic gear oil as it will have friction modifier in it.
Jeep JK Rubicon requires regular gear oil. The Rubicon uses Tru-Lok which is a mechanical lock to lock the left and right axles together. Tru-Lok does not have clutch plates, so an additive is not required. In the Rubicon with Tru-Lok differentials, when the rear differential is not locked, the vehicle uses the TCS (Traction Control System) to monitor the amount of wheel spin of each of the driven wheels. If wheel spin is detected, brake pressure is applied to the slipping wheel(s) to provide stability. This feature of the TCS system functions similar to a limited slip differential and controls the wheel spin across a driven axle. If one wheel on a driven axle is spinning faster than the other, the system will apply the brake of the spinning wheel. This will allow more engine torque to be applied to the wheel that is not spinning. This is how the Rubicon gets by without a limited slip rear differential.

As with any other fluids, refer to your Jeep owner’s manual for the recommended gear oil viscosity. I own a 2012 JK Rubicon, with both front and rear Dana 44 axles, and the recommended gear oil is 80W-90.

Differential Fluid Capacity:
Jeep JK Rubicon front Dana 44     2.70 pints (1.35 quarts)
Jeep JK Rubicon rear Dana 44      4.75 pints (2.375 quarts)
Non Rubicon front differential        2.10 pints (1.05 quarts)
Non Rubicon rear differential         3.80 pints (1.90 quarts)

 

Disclaimer: Like I always mention I am not a professional mechanic, I just try to do as much work on my Jeep as possible. It helps me learn more about my vehicle and save some money that can be spent on parts and upgrades.
I take no responsibility for any injury or breakage which might occur if you decide to follow these steps. You have to decide if you’re comfortable working on your Jeep. If you’re not, please have a professional complete this project for you.
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April 14, 2019 |

Massacre Grounds hiking trail

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Location: Apache Junction, Arizona

Difficulty Rating: Moderate

Route Type: Out & Back

Length: 5.0 miles round trip

Usage: Moderate

Trailhead Elevation: 2,117 ft.

Elevation Gain: 1,087 ft.

Park Fee: No fee

Trailhead Amenities: parking, trail map and information

 

Weather for Apache Junction, AZ
98°
Sunny
WedThuFriSatSun
min 74°F
99/70°F
95/67°F
94/69°F
94/71°F

 

Directions: From central Phoenix, take I-10 east to US 60 east. Exit on Idaho Road, follow Idaho Road north to N Apache Trail, bear right onto N Apache Trail and follow it 0.5 mile past the Lost Dutchman State Park entrance. Turn right onto N First Water Road. Follow this dirt road 0.5 mile where you’ll find a trailhead parking. Parking lot fits about 30 cars and there might be horse trailers used by guided horse tour groups.
 


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March 31, 2019 |

Moonlight Trail / San Tan Trail hiking loop

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Location: San Tan Mountain Regional Park

Park Hours: Sun-Thu: 6am – 8pm / Fri-Sat: 6am – 10pm / 365 days a year

Difficulty Rating: Moderate

Route Type: Loop

Length: 3.5 miles

Usage: Moderate

Trailhead Elevation: 1,400 ft.

Elevation Gain: 131 ft.

Park Fee: $7.00 per vehicle

Trailhead Amenities: parking, visitor center, restrooms, gift shop, trail map and information

 

Weather for Queen Creek, AZ
98°
Partly Cloudy
WedThuFriSatSun
min 73°F
101/69°F
97/66°F
95/69°F
96/72°F

 

Directions: From central Phoenix, take I-10 east to US 60 east. Exit Ellsworth Road south to Hunt Highway. Travel east on Hunt Highway to Thompson Road south. Turn west on Phillips Road to the San Tan Mountain Regional Park entrance.
 


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March 16, 2019 |

Jeep JK Stainless Steel Extended Brake Lines

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Jeep JK Stainless Steel Extended Brake LinesThe most common situation when extended brake lines are necessary is when you install a lift on your Jeep. The distance between the frame/body of the Jeep and axles increases after a suspension lift, therefore longer brake lines are required during articulation. You might also want to replace your stock rubber brake lines with stainless steel braided brake lines when you realize that the stock lines are deteriorating due to weather conditions (very high temperatures in the summer or lots of salt on the road due to ice and snow in the winter) and when you begin noticing a much softer, spongy brake pedal feel. That feeling is most likely due to moisture getting into the brake lines, which leads to reduced boiling point of the fluid and forming of air bubbles, as well as corrosion of the metal components of the system and consequently contamination of the fluid.
Any time you open up the brake system, like when you replace the flexible brake lines, you must perform a proper bleeding procedure. When bleeding the brakes you will need to add more fluid to your master cylinder. I would suggest that while you’re at it, you might as well flush the entire braking system and replace all the brake fluid with fresh one. It is actually recommended that modern vehicles have their brake fluid replaced once every 2 years.
This is due to the fact that most cars today use DOT brake fluid, and the characteristics of that fluid.
DOT brake fluid is hygroscopic, which means it attracts moisture. Over time brake fluid will accumulate a certain amount of moisture; a study by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration found that 20 percent of the cars they tested had brake fluid with 5-percent moisture content. A 3-percent moisture content in DOT 3 brake fluid reduces the boiling point of the fluid by more than 100 degrees.
When moisture in the brake fluid boils because of the tremendous amount of heat generated by the brakes, you can actually lose the ability to stop. In addition to that, the moisture can cause corrosion of the wheel cylinders or brake calipers and eventually cause a leak.
The other thing to watch out for is dirty fluid. Brake fluid can get very dirty if left unchanged year after year. I have seen some master cylinders that look as if they were filled with mud.
With newer model vehicles like the Jeep JK, most common issues stem from the levels of dissolved copper and depleted additive package in modern brake fluids. When the additive package of brake fluid is depleted, one of the negative results may be internal brake system component corrosion and sludge build up.

In this write-up I will be describing the procedure of replacing all four flex brake lines as well as flushing the entire brake system and bleeding the brakes. With brand new, extended stainless steel flex lines and fresh brake fluid flowing thru the entire brake system, as well as replaced brake pads and new, larger brake rotors (see my post), my Jeep’s brakes are going to work as new again. I am performing a complete brake system overhaul in preparation for a suspension lift, to make sure I can confidently drive my lifted Jeep on a daily basis, as well as enjoy wheeling it over some fun obstacles.

Disclaimer: Like I always mention I am not a professional mechanic, I just try to do as much work on my Jeep as possible. It helps me learn more about my vehicle and save some money that can be spent on parts and upgrades.
I take no responsibility for any injury or breakage which might occur if you decide to follow these steps. You have to decide if you’re comfortable working on your Jeep. If you’re not, please have a professional complete this project for you.
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February 24, 2019 |

Jeep JK Big Rotor Kit by Teraflex

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Jeep JK Big Rotor Kit by TeraflexWhen it comes to Jeep upgrades, brakes are often very low on the list of priorities. After upgrading wheels and installing larger 35″ tires, your stock brakes will have a very difficult time stopping your vehicle, both on the road and especially while negotiating thru an obstacle while offroading. When you increase the size and weight of your tires, you should really think about upgrading your brakes as well. It will improve your confidence while driving and just might help you avoid a collision or an accident. New, upgraded brakes are not cheap, however knowing that your braking power has been increased and stopping distance has been reduced is definitely worth the investment.
There are few options when it comes to aftermarket brake kits, which include new rotors, anchor brackets, calipers and brake pads. Most popular options are Teraflex brake kits, Crown Automotive brake kits, Power Stop brake kits and Dynatrac brake kits. You can find kits with rotors and brackets only or kits with rotors, brackets and calipers included. New brake pads sometimes are included with the kit, or you can purchase your favorite brand of brake pads separately. When it comes to rotors, you can find kits with standard vented rotors, slotted rotors, or drilled and slotted rotors. Your decision comes down to preference, your driving conditions and of course your budget.
After a lot of internet browsing and research, I decided to go with Teraflex Performance Big Rotor Kit for both front and rear wheels. I selected standard vented rotors (I believe smooth rotor surface is the best option for a combination of daily driving and weekend offroading, conventional rotors provide highest mass which improves cooling, and with no slots I don’t have to worry about mud collecting there and damaging brake pads prematurely), with included larger anchor brackets which allow for use of the stock calipers and brake pads. After reading reviews on the Teraflex Big Brake Kit, I decided that I don’t want to switch to a two piston caliper and affect the brake pedal feel, as well as possibly having to replace master cylinder.

The TeraFlex JK/JKU Front Performance Big Rotor Kit includes larger 13.3″ (338mm) rotors for improved stopping performance – stock is 11.9″ (302mm), and larger brake caliper relocating anchor brackets. It retains factory brake calipers & brake pads. Rear Performance Big Rotor Kit includes larger 13.5″ (343mm) machined rotors and larger brake caliper relocating anchor brackets, also retaining factory brake calipers & pads.
When installing the Big Rotor Kit there is no need to disconnect the calipers from brake lines therefore you don’t have to bleed the brakes if you don’t want to.

The way this kit works is pretty clever. Moving the location of the caliper outward just a bit accommodates the larger diameter rotor which allows for more efficient heat dissipation and better mechanical advantage in stopping. The increased clamping distance from the rotor center results in greater braking leverage to allow stopping distance to be decreased. It is however worth noting that neither the caliper clamping force nor the pad-to-rotor contact area are increased (as they are with the complete Big Brake Kit).

One thing to remember is that this Jeep JK Big Rotor Kit by Teraflex requires a minimum of 17” diameter wheels.

Disclaimer: Like I always mention I am not a professional mechanic, I just try to do as much work on my Jeep as possible. It helps me learn more about my vehicle and save some money that can be spent on parts and upgrades.
I take no responsibility for any injury or breakage which might occur if you decide to follow these steps. You have to decide if you’re comfortable working on your Jeep. If you’re not, please have a professional complete this project for you.
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February 7, 2019 |

Can Ryan’s Stock JL Keep Up With his Modded TJ Offroad?

Comments Off on Can Ryan’s Stock JL Keep Up With his Modded TJ Offroad?

Stock JL vs Modded TJ

PAOLI, Pa. (February 6th, 2019) – In the latest edition of ExtremeTerrain’s (XT) “Throttle Out” YouTube Series, XT host Ryan Huck visits Rausch Creek Off-Road Park in Pine Grove, PA with his new, stock, 2.0L-powered 2018 JL Wrangler 2-door and his trusty, heavily-modified, 1998 TJ Wrangler to give them a proper shake down while comparing how each performs on the trail.

Ryan has had his TJ since he earned his license over 16 years ago and it was his daily driver until recently, when he purchased his new JL. His TJ has been through several iterations of lift kits and is functionally modified with all the supporting components needed to handle even the toughest of trails. On the other hand, his new JL Wrangler is bone-stock, for the time being, but is equipped with more technology and modern architecture, making for an interesting comparison to his old TJ on the trail. Which one would you choose to take out on your local trail?

Watch it here: https://www.extremeterrain.com/throttleout-feb2019.html
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February 6, 2019 |

Jeep JK Steering and Suspension Torque Specs

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Jeep JK Steering and Suspension Torque SpecsDuring routine maintenance and after doing any kind of modification to your steering, suspension, or drive train, all bolts and nuts should be checked to ensure that they have been tightened to specification.

A good example of when you should ensure that you have properly torqued your Jeep’s nuts and bolts to specification is after installing a lift kit. Another great example that is a bit more common would be your wheels.
When a lift kit is installed, many components may need to be replaced or temporarily removed, upon re-installation these parts must be properly torqued. With the vibrations and impacts that Jeep JK’s experience both on and off-road, improperly torqued bolts could easily be shaken loose and then run the risk of causing the component to fall off. A torque wrench is a precision tool that is used to apply the correct amount of torque to the nut or bolt that is being tightened. There are several types of torque wrenches including a beam type, click type, digital, and dial type.

In order to find the specifications for your Wrangler JK you can look either in the factory service manual for your Jeep or check this post.

Fitment includes: 2007-2018 JK
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January 18, 2019 |

JL Hill Descent Control Tested

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JL Hill Descent Control Tested

PAOLI, Pa. (Jan 15th, 2019) – In this episode of ExtremeTerrain’s Throttle Out YouTube Series, Ryan Huck takes a 2018 JLU to Rausch Creek Off-Road Park in Pine Grove, PA to test the JL Hill Descent Control (HDC). This new feature, available in the JL Wrangler, is only intended for low speed off-road driving. When HDC is activated in 4-low, it automatically applies the brakes while descending hills at speeds below 30 MPH.While using this feature, the driver has control over the exact speed the vehicle will descend — even over bumps, stair steps, and jagged rocks.In addition to his explanation, Ryan walks through, step-by-step, how to activate HDC as well as demonstrating the feature’s capabilities in real-life situations on the trail. Using two different areas of the park for his demonstrations, Ryan tests how well the HDC can handle a variety of trails and surfaces.

Watch it here: https://www.extremeterrain.com/throttle-out-jan2019-2.html
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January 15, 2019 |

Jeep JK A/C Blend Door Actuator Replacement

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Jeep JK A/C Blend Door Actuator ReplacementA/C blend door actuator in your Jeep JK is a very important part of the heating and cooling system and is responsible for controlling the temperature of the air blowing thru the vents and into the cabin. To blow heat into the cabin, the blower motor sends air through the heater core and on through the dash vents. But when heat is not desired, the blend door actuator directs that airflow away from the heater core. Unfortunately blend door actuators can fail at some point and cause the inability to change the air temperature inside your Jeep. The reason I needed to replace the blend door actuator in my Jeep was due to the horrible and loud ticking/grinding noise that it was making every time I put the key in the ignition. I also noticed that the actuator resets itself and makes the same noise after about two minutes from turning off the engine. With the Jeep being topless and doorless, and me using public parking lots, I was afraid someone walking by would freak out and call the cops, thinking my Jeep was about to explode…
You might also experience this loud ticking noise when you open your door, turn on the ignition, or turn the temperature knob on the HVAC control panel. You might also simply not have any hot air coming to the cabin, which means that your blend door actuator is not working at all, and needs replacing.

Here are a couple of videos showcasing the noise being emitted by the broken blend door actuator: video 1 and video 2. I also used these videos in the process of creating this step-by-step write up. Thank you to the authors of the videos!

I could be wrong, but I believe there are actually three actuators installed in a Jeep Wrangler JK, each responsible for different function. There is the blend door actuator responsible for controlling the temperature, the directional actuator (probably not a correct technical name) responsible for directing the air to different vents, and the re-circulation door actuator which controls the air dam behind the glove box.
Each actuator is activated by a different knob or setting on the HVAC control panel.
If you run your Jeep for few minutes, take the glove box out, and turn off the engine, after about two minutes you can see and hear three small motors re-calibrating the three actuators, in sequence.

I do believe all three actuators are the same exact part even though they are mounted in different locations. Blend door actuator is located on the driver side below the steering column, directional actuator is located behind the glove box on the left side, and the re-circulation door actuator is located on the right side of the air dam, behind the right speaker.

This step-by-step write up describes replacement of the blend door actuator only, since that’s the one that failed in my case. As a reference I included a photo of the directional actuator in the last picture.
I have a 2012 Jeep JK so if you own a different Model Year JK, some things might look different.
Replacing the blend door actuator itself is quite simple, however getting access to it is the time consuming part.
The whole process of a Jeep JK A/C blend door actuator replacement will most likely take you about 2-3 hours, depending on few factors, especially on how long it takes you to remove the floor air duct, blocking access to the actuator. That step might take you few minutes or an hour.

Disclaimer:

Like I always mention I am not a professional mechanic, I just try to do as much work on my Jeep as possible. It helps me learn more about my vehicle and save some money that can be spent on parts and upgrades.
I take no responsibility for any injury or breakage which might occur if you decide to follow these steps. You have to decide if you’re comfortable working on your Jeep. If you’re not, please have a professional complete this project for you.
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January 6, 2019 |

Jeep JK Hidden Garage Door Remote

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Jeep JK hidden garage door remoteOne of the greatest benefits of owning a Jeep is the possibility to drive topless and doorless. Removing the top and doors does however leave the interior of your Jeep exposed and unprotected. One of the items that could be stolen from your vehicle is your garage door remote. Most people have it attached to their sun visor, which makes it very visible to a passer by. This post describes the steps to hide your garage door remote inside one of the plastic panels of your Jeep and use a small, discrete push button switch to activate it.

There are several different options when it comes to your Jeep JK hidden garage door remote. Popular, and free, option is to simply hide the garage door remote inside the sport bar padding above the driver door. You can also hide it behind the panel below the steering wheel or behind the dashboard just below your air control panel. You just need to find a place that will allow you to keep the remote secured and drill a small hole to mount the push button switch.
I selected the A-pillar top panel to mount my switch just to the left of the sun visor where I instinctively expect it to be. But if you prefer to place it in a more secret location, you have many options when you own a Jeep.
There’s only few parts and tools needed for this project. You need to pick up a momentary on/off button switch and about 12 inches of 18 GA wire. Some of the tools might be in your tool box already.
Your remote might be different shape of course if your garage door opener is a different brand.

Disclaimer: Like I always mention I am not a professional mechanic, I just try to do as much work on my Jeep as possible. It helps me learn more about my vehicle and save some money that can be spent on parts and upgrades.
I take no responsibility for any injury or breakage which might occur if you decide to follow these steps. You have to decide if you’re comfortable working on your Jeep. If you’re not, please have a professional complete this project for you.
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December 28, 2018 |

JL Turbo vs V6 Off-road Comparison

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JL Turbo vs V6 Off-road Comparison

PAOLI, Pa. (DEC 27th, 2018) – ExtremeTerrain’s (XT) Ryan Huck orchestrated a camera crew and two bone-stock JL Wranglers during a trip to Rausch Creek Off-road park to create this Throttle Out episode comparing the new 2.0L Turbo 4-cylinder Wrangler against a 3.6L V6 JL. The purpose of their mission was to take both JL’s on the trail to see if one engine performed better than the other off-road. In this video, Ryan demonstrates the off-road prowess of both configurations, while hitting a few different types of obstacles to show how each performs at different RPM’s. As a seasoned, technical wheeler, Ryan fights off his natural instincts, putting the throttle down on both JL’s, to provide evidence for his comparison. Even with the difference in power output and power band, both configurations were more than capable of handling the snow-covered trail and were evenly matched in their native off-road environments.

Watch it here: https://www.extremeterrain.com/throttle-out-dec2018-3.html
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December 27, 2018 |

How Jeep Suspension Works

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How Jeep Suspension Works

PAOLI, Pa. (December 19th, 2018) – ExtremeTerrain’s Ryan Huck has produced the video, “How Jeep Suspension Works | Jeep Suspension Geometry Explained”, as an informational tool for the 4×4 community focusing on modified Wranglers. A variety of Jeep lift kits are available for the Wrangler so understanding the components that can improve suspension geometry, handling, and ride quality will, inevitably, make for a well-informed offroader. In this video, Ryan discusses everything from control arms to trackbars, drag links to caster and pinion angles, while explaining their significance in a Jeep with increased ride height. With the assistance of animations and a magnetic angle finder, Ryan extrapolates on suspension geometry, providing his expert voice on a very popular Jeep topic.

View it here: https://www.extremeterrain.com/throttle-out-news-dec2018-2.html
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December 19, 2018 |

What is Death Wobble?

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What is Death Wobble

PAOLI, Pa. (December 11th, 2018) – ExtremeTerrain’s Ryan Huck created a demonstration to show the effects of death wobble on JK Wrangler with a 3.5” Rock Krawler Lift Kit and 35” tires. Equipped with his sophisticated measuring device, aka the Rynograph Wobbleometer™, Ryan runs through a series of tests to show what death wobble is, what you can do when experiencing the sensation, as well as the fix(es) to prevent it from occurring again. From bushings to trackbars, Ryan runs through all the scenarios where death wobble can occur on a Wrangler, so you can stay safe on and off the road!

Watch it here: https://www.extremeterrain.com/throttle-out-news-dec2018.html
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December 11, 2018 |

Jeep JK Vacuum Pump Relocation

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Jeep JK Vacuum Pump RelocationAll 2012-2018 Jeep JK models have the vacuum pump installed in a bracket located on the inside of the driver side frame rail right behind the bumper.
The vacuum pump is there to give added power when braking under emergency situations. It’s part of the BAS/PBS (Brake Assist System/Panic Braking System) and is included in all of the Chrysler vehicles that have the 3.6L engine.
When you make a decision to upgrade the front bumper on your Jeep, you need to realize that the vacuum pump might need to be moved to a different location.
Relocation is only necessary for aftermarket bumpers with recessed winch plate located between frame rails. Relocation is not necessary for non-winch bumpers or top fairlead mount bumpers, where the winch sits on top of the bumper. For bumpers where the winch is mounted on winch plate installed between frame rails, vacuum pump bracket, which is welded to the frame rail, needs to be removed to allow the winch plate to fit.

The most popular option is to relocate the pump into the engine bay, near the Jeep’s computer. After relocating it into the engine compartment, do not be surprised that you’ll hear the vacuum pump run a couple of times after releasing the brake pedal during each cold start. It is rather loud and that is probably the reason behind it’s stock location, as far from the cabin as possible. Getting used to that noise is just a price you’ll have to pay for customizing your rig.

Jeep JK vacuum pump relocation is not a complicated and difficult task. The entire project should take about 2 hours (including grill and bumper removal and reassembly) and you only need few tools. If you prefer to watch a video, here’s one for the bracket kit I selected.

This step-by-step write-up is for a Metalcloak Vacuum Pump Relocation Kit. There are several other kits available out there (e.g. Teraflex Kit, Rock Hard 4×4 Kit, MBRP Kit, Rough Country Kit, Rock Slide Engineering Kit). Some brackets will be installed in the same location and some in other locations, therefore some of the steps described below might not apply to your situation.

Disclaimer: Like I always mention I am not a professional mechanic, I just try to do as much work on my Jeep as possible. It helps me learn more about my vehicle and save some money that can be spent on parts and upgrades.
I take no responsibility for any injury or breakage which might occur if you decide to follow these steps. You have to decide if you’re comfortable working on your Jeep. If you’re not, please have a professional complete this project for you.
IMPORTANT: Relocating the vacuum pump will most likely void your warranty on the pump.
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August 25, 2018 |
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