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Moonlight Trail / San Tan Trail hiking loop

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Location: San Tan Mountain Regional Park

Park Hours: Sun-Thu: 6am – 8pm / Fri-Sat: 6am – 10pm / 365 days a year

Difficulty Rating: Moderate

Route Type: Loop

Length: 3.5 miles

Usage: Moderate

Trailhead Elevation: 1,400 ft.

Elevation Gain: 131 ft.

Park Fee: $7.00 per vehicle

Trailhead Amenities: parking, visitor center, restrooms, gift shop, trail map and information

 

Clear
Monday
03/18/2019 0%
High 83° / Low 55°
Clear
Tuesday
03/19/2019 0%
High 83° / Low 57°
Overcast
Wednesday
03/20/2019 0%
High 82° / Low 52°
Clear
Thursday
03/21/2019 0%
High 70° / Low 47°
Clear
Friday
03/22/2019 0%
High 71° / Low 49°

 

Directions: From central Phoenix, take I-10 east to US 60 east. Exit Ellsworth Road south to Hunt Highway. Travel east on Hunt Highway to Thompson Road south. Turn west on Phillips Road to the San Tan Mountain Regional Park entrance.
 


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March 16, 2019 |

Jeep JK Stainless Steel Extended Brake Lines

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Jeep JK Stainless Steel Extended Brake LinesThe most common situation when extended brake lines are necessary is when you install a lift on your Jeep. The distance between the frame/body of the Jeep and axles increases after a suspension lift, therefore longer brake lines are required during articulation. You might also want to replace your stock rubber brake lines with stainless steel braided brake lines when you realize that the stock lines are deteriorating due to weather conditions (very high temperatures in the summer or lots of salt on the road due to ice and snow in the winter) and when you begin noticing a much softer, spongy brake pedal feel. That feeling is most likely due to moisture getting into the brake lines, which leads to reduced boiling point of the fluid and forming of air bubbles, as well as corrosion of the metal components of the system and consequently contamination of the fluid.
Any time you open up the brake system, like when you replace the flexible brake lines, you must perform a proper bleeding procedure. When bleeding the brakes you will need to add more fluid to your master cylinder. I would suggest that while you’re at it, you might as well flush the entire braking system and replace all the brake fluid with fresh one. It is actually recommended that modern vehicles have their brake fluid replaced once every 2 years.
This is due to the fact that most cars today use DOT brake fluid, and the characteristics of that fluid.
DOT brake fluid is hygroscopic, which means it attracts moisture. Over time brake fluid will accumulate a certain amount of moisture; a study by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration found that 20 percent of the cars they tested had brake fluid with 5-percent moisture content. A 3-percent moisture content in DOT 3 brake fluid reduces the boiling point of the fluid by more than 100 degrees.
When moisture in the brake fluid boils because of the tremendous amount of heat generated by the brakes, you can actually lose the ability to stop. In addition to that, the moisture can cause corrosion of the wheel cylinders or brake calipers and eventually cause a leak.
The other thing to watch out for is dirty fluid. Brake fluid can get very dirty if left unchanged year after year. I have seen some master cylinders that look as if they were filled with mud.
With newer model vehicles like the Jeep JK, most common issues stem from the levels of dissolved copper and depleted additive package in modern brake fluids. When the additive package of brake fluid is depleted, one of the negative results may be internal brake system component corrosion and sludge build up.

In this write-up I will be describing the procedure of replacing all four flex brake lines as well as flushing the entire brake system and bleeding the brakes. With brand new, extended stainless steel flex lines and fresh brake fluid flowing thru the entire brake system, as well as replaced brake pads and new, larger brake rotors (see my post), my Jeep’s brakes are going to work as new again. I am performing a complete brake system overhaul in preparation for a suspension lift, to make sure I can confidently drive my lifted Jeep on a daily basis, as well as enjoy wheeling it over some fun obstacles.

Disclaimer: Like I always mention I am not a professional mechanic, I just try to do as much work on my Jeep as possible. It helps me learn more about my vehicle and save some money that can be spent on parts and upgrades.
I take no responsibility for any injury or breakage which might occur if you decide to follow these steps. You have to decide if you’re comfortable working on your Jeep. If you’re not, please have a professional complete this project for you.
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February 24, 2019 |

Jeep JK Big Rotor Kit by Teraflex

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Jeep JK Big Rotor Kit by TeraflexWhen it comes to Jeep upgrades, brakes are often very low on the list of priorities. After upgrading wheels and installing larger 35″ tires, your stock brakes will have a very difficult time stopping your vehicle, both on the road and especially while negotiating thru an obstacle while offroading. When you increase the size and weight of your tires, you should really think about upgrading your brakes as well. It will improve your confidence while driving and just might help you avoid a collision or an accident. New, upgraded brakes are not cheap, however knowing that your braking power has been increased and stopping distance has been reduced is definitely worth the investment.
There are few options when it comes to aftermarket brake kits, which include new rotors, anchor brackets, calipers and brake pads. Most popular options are Teraflex brake kits, Crown Automotive brake kits, Power Stop brake kits and Dynatrac brake kits. You can find kits with rotors and brackets only or kits with rotors, brackets and calipers included. New brake pads sometimes are included with the kit, or you can purchase your favorite brand of brake pads separately. When it comes to rotors, you can find kits with standard vented rotors, slotted rotors, or drilled and slotted rotors. Your decision comes down to preference, your driving conditions and of course your budget.
After a lot of internet browsing and research, I decided to go with Teraflex Performance Big Rotor Kit for both front and rear wheels. I selected standard vented rotors (I believe smooth rotor surface is the best option for a combination of daily driving and weekend offroading, conventional rotors provide highest mass which improves cooling, and with no slots I don’t have to worry about mud collecting there and damaging brake pads prematurely), with included larger anchor brackets which allow for use of the stock calipers and brake pads. After reading reviews on the Teraflex Big Brake Kit, I decided that I don’t want to switch to a two piston caliper and affect the brake pedal feel, as well as possibly having to replace master cylinder.

The TeraFlex JK/JKU Front Performance Big Rotor Kit includes larger 13.3″ (338mm) rotors for improved stopping performance – stock is 11.9″ (302mm), and larger brake caliper relocating anchor brackets. It retains factory brake calipers & brake pads. Rear Performance Big Rotor Kit includes larger 13.5″ (343mm) machined rotors and larger brake caliper relocating anchor brackets, also retaining factory brake calipers & pads.
When installing the Big Rotor Kit there is no need to disconnect the calipers from brake lines therefore you don’t have to bleed the brakes if you don’t want to.

The way this kit works is pretty clever. Moving the location of the caliper outward just a bit accommodates the larger diameter rotor which allows for more efficient heat dissipation and better mechanical advantage in stopping. The increased clamping distance from the rotor center results in greater braking leverage to allow stopping distance to be decreased. It is however worth noting that neither the caliper clamping force nor the pad-to-rotor contact area are increased (as they are with the complete Big Brake Kit).

One thing to remember is that this Jeep JK Big Rotor Kit by Teraflex requires a minimum of 17” diameter wheels.

Disclaimer: Like I always mention I am not a professional mechanic, I just try to do as much work on my Jeep as possible. It helps me learn more about my vehicle and save some money that can be spent on parts and upgrades.
I take no responsibility for any injury or breakage which might occur if you decide to follow these steps. You have to decide if you’re comfortable working on your Jeep. If you’re not, please have a professional complete this project for you.
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February 7, 2019 |

Can Ryan’s Stock JL Keep Up With his Modded TJ Offroad?

Comments Off on Can Ryan’s Stock JL Keep Up With his Modded TJ Offroad?

Stock JL vs Modded TJ
PAOLI, Pa. (February 6th, 2019) – In the latest edition of ExtremeTerrain’s (XT) “Throttle Out” YouTube Series, XT host Ryan Huck visits Rausch Creek Off-Road Park in Pine Grove, PA with his new, stock, 2.0L-powered 2018 JL Wrangler 2-door and his trusty, heavily-modified, 1998 TJ Wrangler to give them a proper shake down while comparing how each performs on the trail.

Ryan has had his TJ since he earned his license over 16 years ago and it was his daily driver until recently, when he purchased his new JL. His TJ has been through several iterations of lift kits and is functionally modified with all the supporting components needed to handle even the toughest of trails. On the other hand, his new JL Wrangler is bone-stock, for the time being, but is equipped with more technology and modern architecture, making for an interesting comparison to his old TJ on the trail. Which one would you choose to take out on your local trail?

Watch it here: https://www.extremeterrain.com/throttleout-feb2019.html
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February 6, 2019 |

Jeep JK Steering and Suspension Torque Specs

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Jeep JK Steering and Suspension Torque SpecsDuring routine maintenance and after doing any kind of modification to your steering, suspension, or drive train, all bolts and nuts should be checked to ensure that they have been tightened to specification.

A good example of when you should ensure that you have properly torqued your Jeep’s nuts and bolts to specification is after installing a lift kit. Another great example that is a bit more common would be your wheels.
When a lift kit is installed, many components may need to be replaced or temporarily removed, upon re-installation these parts must be properly torqued. With the vibrations and impacts that Jeep JK’s experience both on and off-road, improperly torqued bolts could easily be shaken loose and then run the risk of causing the component to fall off. A torque wrench is a precision tool that is used to apply the correct amount of torque to the nut or bolt that is being tightened. There are several types of torque wrenches including a beam type, click type, digital, and dial type.

In order to find the specifications for your Wrangler JK you can look either in the factory service manual for your Jeep or check this post.

Fitment includes: 2007-2018 JK
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January 18, 2019 |

JL Hill Descent Control Tested

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JL Hill Descent Control Tested
PAOLI, Pa. (Jan 15th, 2019) – In this episode of ExtremeTerrain’s Throttle Out YouTube Series, Ryan Huck takes a 2018 JLU to Rausch Creek Off-Road Park in Pine Grove, PA to test the JL Hill Descent Control (HDC). This new feature, available in the JL Wrangler, is only intended for low speed off-road driving. When HDC is activated in 4-low, it automatically applies the brakes while descending hills at speeds below 30 MPH.While using this feature, the driver has control over the exact speed the vehicle will descend — even over bumps, stair steps, and jagged rocks.In addition to his explanation, Ryan walks through, step-by-step, how to activate HDC as well as demonstrating the feature’s capabilities in real-life situations on the trail. Using two different areas of the park for his demonstrations, Ryan tests how well the HDC can handle a variety of trails and surfaces.

Watch it here: https://www.extremeterrain.com/throttle-out-jan2019-2.html
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January 15, 2019 |

Jeep JK A/C Blend Door Actuator Replacement

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Jeep JK A/C Blend Door Actuator ReplacementA/C blend door actuator in your Jeep JK is a very important part of the heating and cooling system and is responsible for controlling the temperature of the air blowing thru the vents and into the cabin. To blow heat into the cabin, the blower motor sends air through the heater core and on through the dash vents. But when heat is not desired, the blend door actuator directs that airflow away from the heater core. Unfortunately blend door actuators can fail at some point and cause the inability to change the air temperature inside your Jeep. The reason I needed to replace the blend door actuator in my Jeep was due to the horrible and loud ticking/grinding noise that it was making every time I put the key in the ignition. I also noticed that the actuator resets itself and makes the same noise after about two minutes from turning off the engine. With the Jeep being topless and doorless, and me using public parking lots, I was afraid someone walking by would freak out and call the cops, thinking my Jeep was about to explode…
You might also experience this loud ticking noise when you open your door, turn on the ignition, or turn the temperature knob on the HVAC control panel. You might also simply not have any hot air coming to the cabin, which means that your blend door actuator is not working at all, and needs replacing.

Here are a couple of videos showcasing the noise being emitted by the broken blend door actuator: video 1 and video 2. I also used these videos in the process of creating this step-by-step write up. Thank you to the authors of the videos!

I could be wrong, but I believe there are actually three actuators installed in a Jeep Wrangler JK, each responsible for different function. There is the blend door actuator responsible for controlling the temperature, the directional actuator (probably not a correct technical name) responsible for directing the air to different vents, and the re-circulation door actuator which controls the air dam behind the glove box.
Each actuator is activated by a different knob or setting on the HVAC control panel.
If you run your Jeep for few minutes, take the glove box out, and turn off the engine, after about two minutes you can see and hear three small motors re-calibrating the three actuators, in sequence.

I do believe all three actuators are the same exact part even though they are mounted in different locations. Blend door actuator in located on the driver side below the steering column, directional actuator is located behind the glove box on the left side, and the re-circulation door actuator is located on the right side of the air dam, behind the right speaker.

This step-by-step write up describes replacement of the blend door actuator only, since that’s the one that failed in my case. As a reference I included a photo of the directional actuator in the last picture.
I have a 2012 Jeep JK so if you own a different Model Year JK, some things might look different.
Replacing the blend door actuator itself is quite simple, however getting access to it is the time consuming part.
The whole process of a Jeep JK A/C blend door actuator replacement will most likely take you about 2-3 hours, depending on few factors, especially on how long it takes you to remove the floor air duct, blocking access to the actuator. That step might take you few minutes or an hour.

Disclaimer:

Like I always mention I am not a professional mechanic, I just try to do as much work on my Jeep as possible. It helps me learn more about my vehicle and save some money that can be spent on parts and upgrades.
I take no responsibility for any injury or breakage which might occur if you decide to follow these steps. You have to decide if you’re comfortable working on your Jeep. If you’re not, please have a professional complete this project for you.
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January 6, 2019 |

Jeep JK Hidden Garage Door Remote

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Jeep JK hidden garage door remoteOne of the greatest benefits of owning a Jeep is the possibility to drive topless and doorless. Removing the top and doors does however leave the interior of your Jeep exposed and unprotected. One of the items that could be stolen from your vehicle is your garage door remote. Most people have it attached to their sun visor, which makes it very visible to a passer by. This post describes the steps to hide your garage door remote inside one of the plastic panels of your Jeep and use a small, discrete push button switch to activate it.

There are several different options when it comes to your Jeep JK hidden garage door remote. Popular, and free, option is to simply hide the garage door remote inside the sport bar padding above the driver door. You can also hide it behind the panel below the steering wheel or behind the dashboard just below your air control panel. You just need to find a place that will allow you to keep the remote secured and drill a small hole to mount the push button switch.
I selected the A-pillar top panel to mount my switch just to the left of the sun visor where I instinctively expect it to be. But if you prefer to place it in a more secret location, you have many options when you own a Jeep.
There’s only few parts and tools needed for this project. You need to pick up a momentary on/off button switch and about 12 inches of 18 GA wire. Some of the tools might be in your tool box already.
Your remote might be different shape of course if your garage door opener is a different brand.

Disclaimer: Like I always mention I am not a professional mechanic, I just try to do as much work on my Jeep as possible. It helps me learn more about my vehicle and save some money that can be spent on parts and upgrades.
I take no responsibility for any injury or breakage which might occur if you decide to follow these steps. You have to decide if you’re comfortable working on your Jeep. If you’re not, please have a professional complete this project for you.
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December 28, 2018 |

JL Turbo vs V6 Off-road Comparison

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JL Turbo vs V6 Off-road Comparison
PAOLI, Pa. (DEC 27th, 2018) – ExtremeTerrain’s (XT) Ryan Huck orchestrated a camera crew and two bone-stock JL Wranglers during a trip to Rausch Creek Off-road park to create this Throttle Out episode comparing the new 2.0L Turbo 4-cylinder Wrangler against a 3.6L V6 JL. The purpose of their mission was to take both JL’s on the trail to see if one engine performed better than the other off-road. In this video, Ryan demonstrates the off-road prowess of both configurations, while hitting a few different types of obstacles to show how each performs at different RPM’s. As a seasoned, technical wheeler, Ryan fights off his natural instincts, putting the throttle down on both JL’s, to provide evidence for his comparison. Even with the difference in power output and power band, both configurations were more than capable of handling the snow-covered trail and were evenly matched in their native off-road environments.

Watch it here: https://www.extremeterrain.com/throttle-out-dec2018-3.html
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December 27, 2018 |

How Jeep Suspension Works

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How Jeep Suspension Works
PAOLI, Pa. (December 19th, 2018) – ExtremeTerrain’s Ryan Huck has produced the video, “How Jeep Suspension Works | Jeep Suspension Geometry Explained”, as an informational tool for the 4×4 community focusing on modified Wranglers. A variety of Jeep lift kits are available for the Wrangler so understanding the components that can improve suspension geometry, handling, and ride quality will, inevitably, make for a well-informed offroader. In this video, Ryan discusses everything from control arms to trackbars, drag links to caster and pinion angles, while explaining their significance in a Jeep with increased ride height. With the assistance of animations and a magnetic angle finder, Ryan extrapolates on suspension geometry, providing his expert voice on a very popular Jeep topic.

View it here: https://www.extremeterrain.com/throttle-out-news-dec2018-2.html
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December 19, 2018 |

What is Death Wobble?

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What is Death Wobble
PAOLI, Pa. (December 11th, 2018) – ExtremeTerrain’s Ryan Huck created a demonstration to show the effects of death wobble on JK Wrangler with a 3.5” Rock Krawler Lift Kit and 35” tires. Equipped with his sophisticated measuring device, aka the Rynograph Wobbleometer™, Ryan runs through a series of tests to show what death wobble is, what you can do when experiencing the sensation, as well as the fix(es) to prevent it from occurring again. From bushings to trackbars, Ryan runs through all the scenarios where death wobble can occur on a Wrangler, so you can stay safe on and off the road!

Watch it here: https://www.extremeterrain.com/throttle-out-news-dec2018.html
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December 11, 2018 |

Jeep JK Vacuum Pump Relocation

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Jeep JK Vacuum Pump RelocationAll 2012-2018 Jeep JK models have the vacuum pump installed in a bracket located on the inside of the driver side frame rail right behind the bumper.
The vacuum pump is there to give added power when braking under emergency situations. It’s part of the BAS/PBS (Brake Assist System/Panic Braking System) and is included in all of the Chrysler vehicles that have the 3.6L engine.
When you make a decision to upgrade the front bumper on your Jeep, you need to realize that the vacuum pump might need to be moved to a different location.
Relocation is only necessary for aftermarket bumpers with recessed winch plate located between frame rails. Relocation is not necessary for non-winch bumpers or top fairlead mount bumpers, where the winch sits on top of the bumper. For bumpers where the winch is mounted on winch plate installed between frame rails, vacuum pump bracket, which is welded to the frame rail, needs to be removed to allow the winch plate to fit.

The most popular option is to relocate the pump into the engine bay, near the Jeep’s computer. After relocating it into the engine compartment, do not be surprised that you’ll hear the vacuum pump run a couple of times after releasing the brake pedal during each cold start. It is rather loud and that is probably the reason behind it’s stock location, as far from the cabin as possible. Getting used to that noise is just a price you’ll have to pay for customizing your rig.

Jeep JK vacuum pump relocation is not a complicated and difficult task. The entire project should take about 2 hours (including grill and bumper removal and reassembly) and you only need few tools. If you prefer to watch a video, here’s one for the bracket kit I selected.

This step-by-step write-up is for a Metalcloak Vacuum Pump Relocation Kit. There are several other kits available out there (e.g. Teraflex Kit, Rock Hard 4×4 Kit, MBRP Kit, Rough Country Kit, Rock Slide Engineering Kit). Some brackets will be installed in the same location and some in other locations, therefore some of the steps described below might not apply to your situation.

Disclaimer: Like I always mention I am not a professional mechanic, I just try to do as much work on my Jeep as possible. It helps me learn more about my vehicle and save some money that can be spent on parts and upgrades.
I take no responsibility for any injury or breakage which might occur if you decide to follow these steps. You have to decide if you’re comfortable working on your Jeep. If you’re not, please have a professional complete this project for you.
IMPORTANT: Relocating the vacuum pump will most likely void your warranty on the pump.
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August 25, 2018 |

Second Water hiking trail

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Location: Apache Junction, Arizona

Difficulty Rating: Moderate

Route Type: Out & Back

Length: 7.0 miles round trip

Usage: Low

Trailhead Elevation: 2,258 ft.

Elevation Gain: -368 ft.

Park Fee: No fee

Trailhead Amenities: parking, restrooms (portable), trail map and information

 

Clear
Monday
03/18/2019 0%
High 77° / Low 52°
Clear
Tuesday
03/19/2019 0%
High 79° / Low 55°
Mostly Cloudy
Wednesday
03/20/2019 0%
High 78° / Low 51°
Clear
Thursday
03/21/2019 20%
High 66° / Low 46°
Clear
Friday
03/22/2019 0%
High 68° / Low 47°

 

Directions: From central Phoenix, take I-10 east to US 60 east. Exit on Idaho Road, follow Idaho Road north to N Apache Trail, bear right onto N Apache Trail and follow it 0.5 mile past the Lost Dutchman State Park entrance. Turn right onto N First Water Road. Follow this dirt road 2.5 miles all the way to the end where you’ll find a trailhead parking. Parking lot fits about 50 cars, but the overflow “horse lot”, about 0.5 mile back, will fit additional vehicles.
 


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August 16, 2018 |

Miners Needle Loop hiking trail

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Location: Gold Canyon, Arizona

Difficulty Rating: Moderate

Route Type: Loop

Length: 9.0 miles

Usage: Moderate

Trailhead Elevation: 2,400 ft.

Elevation Gain: 800 ft.

Park Fee: No fee

Trailhead Amenities: parking, restrooms (portable), trail map and information

 

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Directions: From Phoenix take US 60 east all the way to Gold Canyon. Turn left on E Peralta Road. Follow E Peralta Road north east. After about a mile it turns into a dirt road. Follow the road for about 7 miles, all the way to the end where you’ll find the trailhead parking lot, with overflow parking lot 1/4 mile back.
 


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July 22, 2018 |

Hawley Lake Campground

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Location: East of McNary, Arizona

Elevation: 8,170 feet

Season: All Year

Access: Paved road

Fee: $9.00 per camp site per night

Reservations: No reservations. Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Usage: Medium

Days Limit: 10 days

Amenities: 100 single unit sites, tent camping, trailer camping, trailers and motorhomes up to 10 foot, no hookups, picnic tables (at most campsites), potable water faucets, vault toilets, pets must be restrained or on a leash

Information: Pinetop Game & Fish Department (928) 367-4281, the Apache Sitgreaves National Forest at (928) 368-2100 www.fs.usda.gov/asnf or White Mountain Apache Tribe Game & Fish Department

 

 

Partly Cloudy
Monday
03/18/2019 20%
High 55° / Low 30°
Clear
Tuesday
03/19/2019 0%
High 55° / Low 34°
Chance of Rain
Wednesday
03/20/2019 50%
High 56° / Low 36°
Snow
Thursday
03/21/2019 60%
High 45° / Low 28°
Partly Cloudy
Friday
03/22/2019 20%
High 47° / Low 27°

 

 

Directions: From Show Low, Take SR 260 east 7 miles past McNary to SR 473 turn right and travel 9 miles to Hawley Lake Campground.
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July 14, 2018 |

Horseshoe Cienega Lake Campground

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Location: East of McNary, Arizona.

Elevation: 8,225 feet

Season: May through October

Access: Dirt road

Fee: $9.00 per camp site per night

Reservations: No reservations. Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Usage: Medium

Days Limit: No

Amenities: 70 single unit sites, tent camping, trailer camping, trailers and motorhomes up to 10 foot, no hookups, picnic tables (at most campsites), potable water faucets, vault toilets, pets must be restrained or on a leash

Information: Pinetop Game & Fish Department (928) 367-4281, the Apache Sitgreaves National Forest at (928) 368-2100 www.fs.usda.gov/asnf or White Mountain Apache Tribe Game & Fish Department

 

 

Partly Cloudy
Monday
03/18/2019 20%
High 55° / Low 30°
Clear
Tuesday
03/19/2019 0%
High 55° / Low 34°
Chance of Rain
Wednesday
03/20/2019 50%
High 56° / Low 36°
Snow
Thursday
03/21/2019 60%
High 45° / Low 28°
Partly Cloudy
Friday
03/22/2019 20%
High 47° / Low 27°

 

 

Directions: Travel east on State Route 260 nine miles east of McNary. Take a right at the lake entrance and the campground lies 1.3 miles away.
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July 14, 2018 |

Treasure Loop hiking trail

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Location: Lost Dutchman State Park

Park Hours: Sunrise – 10:00 p.m. / Park is open year-round except Christmas Day

Difficulty Rating: Moderate

Route Type: Loop

Length: 2.5 miles

Usage: High

Trailhead Elevation: 2,080 ft.

Elevation Gain: 500 ft.

Park Fee: $7.00 per vehicle

Trailhead Amenities: parking, restrooms, trail map and information

 

Clear
Monday
03/18/2019 0%
High 79° / Low 54°
Clear
Tuesday
03/19/2019 0%
High 81° / Low 57°
Mostly Cloudy
Wednesday
03/20/2019 0%
High 80° / Low 52°
Clear
Thursday
03/21/2019 10%
High 68° / Low 47°
Clear
Friday
03/22/2019 0%
High 69° / Low 49°

 

Directions: From central Phoenix, take I-10 east to US 60 east. Exit on Idaho Road, follow Idaho Road north to N Apache Trail, bear right onto N Apache Trail and follow it to the Lost Dutchman State Park entrance.
 


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April 4, 2018 |

Wave Cave hiking trail

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Location: Gold Canyon, Arizona

Difficulty Rating: Moderate/Difficult

Route Type: Out & Back

Length: 3.5 miles round trip

Usage: Moderate

Trailhead Elevation: 2,200 ft.

Elevation Gain: 990 ft.

Park Fee: Arizona State Land Department Recreational Permit and Parking Pass is required

Trailhead Amenities: parking only

 

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Directions: From Phoenix take US 60 east all the way to Gold Canyon. Turn left on E Peralta Road. Follow E Peralta Road north east. After about a mile it turns into a dirt road. Follow the road for about 6 miles, the small parking lot is on the west side of the road.
 


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February 11, 2018 |

Peralta hiking trail

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Location: Gold Canyon, Arizona

Difficulty Rating: Moderate

Route Type: Out & Back

Length: 5.0 miles round trip

Usage: Moderate

Trailhead Elevation: 2,400 ft.

Elevation Gain: 1,380 ft.

Park Fee: No fee

Trailhead Amenities: parking, restrooms (portable), trail map and information

 

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Currently
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Currently
Currently

 

Directions: From Phoenix take US 60 east all the way to Gold Canyon. Turn left on E Peralta Road. Follow E Peralta Road north east. After about a mile it turns into a dirt road. Follow the road for about 7 miles, all the way to the end where you’ll find the trailhead parking lot.
 


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December 3, 2017 |

Jeep JK Security Tailgate Enclosure by Tuffy

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Jeep JK Security Tailgate Enclosure by TuffyOne of the best aspects of owning a Jeep is the ability to drive topless and doorless. The only downside of topless driving is the fact that anything stored in the “trunk” space behind the rear seat is visible and easily accessible. For the last few years, every time I would take the top down, while using my Jeep for daily driving, I would also remove my tool bag and recovery gear form my Jeep and leave it in the garage. I felt that it is not secure in my trunk and it’s way too valuable to risk having it stolen. I finally decided to look into securing the cargo area while driving topless. I did some research looking for a Jeep JK security tailgate enclosure and it seems like there’s two products available that provide exactly what I was looking for. One of them is the Tuffy Security Products Tailgate Security Enclosure and the other is the Bestop Instatrunk.

Both these tailgate security enclosures are simple but solid designs made out of 16-gauge steel, that create a lockable storage trunk completely protected on all sides. They work in conjunction with the lockable vehicle tailgate to secure the trunk area created. Both these enclosures maintain the use and function of the rear seat in 2-door models. The installation is quick and easy using standard hand tools in both 2 and 4 door Jeep models with an OEM hardtop or soft top. Both these products mount to the floor of the Jeep from the inside of the trunk. The enclosures work in vehicles equipped with or without the subwoofer.
 
There are several options of these enclosures, depending on the year and model of your Jeep:

– Tuffy 297-01 Tailgate Enclosure for 87′-95′ Jeep Wrangler YJ

– Tuffy 296-01 Tailgate Enclosure for 97′-06′ Jeep Wrangler TJ

– Tuffy 286-01 Tailgate Enclosure for 07′-10′ Jeep Wrangler JK 2 door

– Tuffy 310-01 Tailgate Enclosure for 07′-10′ Jeep Wrangler JK 4 door

– Tuffy 282-01 Tailgate Enclosure for 11′-17′ Jeep Wrangler JK 2 door

– Tuffy 299-01 Tailgate Enclosure for 11′-17′ Jeep Wrangler JK 4 door

– Bestop 42700-01 Instatrunk for 87′-95′ Jeep Wrangler YJ

– Bestop 42701-01 Instatrunk for 97′-06′ Jeep Wrangler TJ

– Bestop 42702-01 Instatrunk for 07′-10′ Jeep Wrangler JK 2 door or 4 door (without factory subwoofer)

– Bestop 42637-01 Instatrunk for 07′-10′ Jeep Wrangler JK 2 door or 4 door (with factory subwoofer)

– Bestop 42704-01 Instatrunk for 11′-17′ Jeep Wrangler JK 2 door or 4 door

 

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November 24, 2017 |
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